Growth

Best Referral Marketing Practices For Your E-commerce Store (with PixlFeed)!

Improve your e-commerce word-of-mouth performance with a few simple optimisations

Christian Lovrecich from PixlFeed Media and the host of PixlFeed Radio in conversation with our CEO, Jay Gibb, discussed best practices to drive word-of-mouth sales and nearly triple the performance of existing referral programs.

Via anecdotal evidence from CloudSponge e-commerce clients such as Stitch Fix, and JustFab – they discover just how a single button can be critical and game-changing for any e-commerce referral program.

Double the performance of your referral programs in 3 easy steps

Download our DIY Workbook today

Podcast Transcript

Christian Lovrecich:
Hey everyone. Welcome to another episode of PixelFeed Radio. I mean, I’m here with my friend Jay Gibb today. Jay, how are you doing today?

Jay Gibb:
Doing well. Doing well. How are you doing, Christian?

Christian Lovrecich:
Doing all right but as usual, because this show can never go without technical difficulties here and there, we’ve been messing around for the last 10 minutes but good thing you’re a developer so we were able to figure it out quickly.

Jay Gibb:
We got it. We got it.

Christian Lovrecich:
We did. For those of you that don’t know Jay, he’s a former software engineer and the founder and CEO of a SAS company called CloudSponge. And basically what CloudSponge does together with his team they have helped thousands of e-commerce businesses optimize their word-of-mouth sells since 2010. They have a unique blend of tech expertise and soft skills.

Christian Lovrecich:
And Jay is, it’s basically an expert on helping e-commerce stores build the right features to reduce customer acquisition cost and increase sales which everybody who owns e-commerce stores like I do wants to hear all day long. So before we get into it and start talking about CloudSponge and all that good stuff, obviously you were a developer first. So why don’t you take me a little bit through your background. Were you always an entrepreneur since you were a kid or did you start on the developing side of things and then work your way to it? Did you decide to go on your own at some point?

Jay Gibb:
No, I can’t say that I was entrepreneurial sort of from the beginning. I definitely have always been a worker. I’ve always had a job ever since I was really small. Paper routes and cutting grass and kind of doing what I could to make money. So maybe you call that being entrepreneurial, I don’t know. But yeah, I’ve definitely been figuring out how to make a few bucks here and there ever since I was a little kid.

Jay Gibb:
But then as far as entrepreneurial activity the way you’re thinking about it, that’s probably something where I actually took a risk and decided to get away from a job and do some things on my own. Part where maybe eight or 10 years after I got out of school. Right. So it was not an immediate instinct for me.

Christian Lovrecich:
So you weren’t one of those kids starting businesses all the time and then through college and all that and you went the conventional way of going to school, learning your craft and then getting a job after school, I’m assuming after you graduated college and then got experience in the field and then decided to go on your own. Correct?

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. More or less. Yeah. I kind of got to a place in my career path where I could see the ceiling. Oh that’s not cool. I got to do something that doesn’t have a ceiling or has a little bit more head room. And so then I started to make that transition to startups and do my own thing.

Christian Lovrecich:
Was that a difficult transition to do at the time?

Jay Gibb:
No. I didn’t do it cut and dry. And I kind of did overlap nights and weekends kind of a slow, careful approach. So no, it wasn’t difficult. It was a lot of work, right. It was work but it wasn’t a racked up a bunch of debt and credit card bills and it kind of went without any income for a while. I always made sure that I had-

Christian Lovrecich:
That’s my story.

Jay Gibb:
Pretty reliable source of income and just lots and lots and lots of little baby steps for a lot of years. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
So you did it the smart way. I did it the dumb way. The dumb way was, you know what? I’m just going to figure this out. I don’t care if I’m broke or I leave on the street. I’ll figure it out at some point. And then I went ahead in first, but I was always that type of kid starting things left and right. I could not hold a job. I would get fired from every job because I didn’t like people telling me what to do which is weird because now customers tell me what to do, but somehow that’s okay because they’re paying me money I guess. But it’s like you said, there’s no ceiling.

Christian Lovrecich:
I can take it as far as I want. It’s a different relationship too with customers. You want to take care of your customers, your clients, your users and all that stuff. So it’s a different relationship. It’s just my issue growing up was, when I got all these jobs it was I always felt like I was smarter than my bosses. And that’s just me being cocky in a way because you think you know it all when you’re a kid, when you’re young and then you start to realize, oh, maybe he was right about this or maybe they were right about this. But a lot of it I was right from the beginning, so that’s what kept me going. So how did that.

Jay Gibb:
I think part of the difference is you can fire your customers, right. It’s kind of hard to fire your boss, right?

Christian Lovrecich:
Yeah. Yeah. That’s true.

Jay Gibb:
If you get a customer that’s not right for you or you’re not right for them, you can just say no and reserve the right to refuse service to anyone. And so you still get that ability to control what you need to control and live the life you want to live.

Christian Lovrecich:
Not always though, once you’re established, you do have that luxury and you really vet who you work with or who you don’t work with. But when you’re starting out and you did it like what I called the dumb way, it’s I got to figure this out. You got to take whoever you can at first. And yes, some of those are nightmares and you just have to deal with it. And you just got to try your best and deal with the headaches.

Christian Lovrecich:
But if you keep going, if you keep crafting, working on your craft eventually you’re going to build, what do you call, a book of referrals and all that good stuff. And once you get to that point, then yeah, absolutely man. I can be like, “You know what? This is not a good fit. Let’s go our separate ways.” And be done with it. And there’s someone else you can bring on. So how did the idea for CloudSponge come around?

Jay Gibb:
It’s a story that starts off with scratching our own itch and building something that didn’t exist that we needed. And then in this case that was what we call the contact picker. So just to paint a mental image so you know what I’m talking about.

Christian Lovrecich:
Sure.

Jay Gibb:
It’s that interface on a website that has all your contacts in it. So you authenticate with Google or Yahoo or whatever, loads up all your contacts from your address book and allows you to select whoever you want for whatever you’re doing. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Right.

Jay Gibb:
And so we started off, we built that because it was sort of a feature that was required for something else we were doing. And it was hard to do. It was hard to build. There wasn’t any good solutions out there. We tried all the sort of software packages that were available and none of them were good enough. Right. So we built it ourselves and it was cool because as we were exploring the options we discovered all kinds of other people like us that were also exploring the options. People were asking questions, “Oh, this doesn’t work. This doesn’t work. How do I get it to do this?”

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Jay Gibb:
They were hitting all the same problems with the incumbent solutions that we were hitting. And so we kind of knew if we actually build a good contact picker, there’s a bunch of people that would probably buy it. Right. Most likely there’s all these guys that are all frustrated with the same thing we’re frustrated with, maybe they will all buy it. Right. So we did a little customer development and validated that. And then basically rather than building the thing that the contact picker was going to be a feature of, we decided just to sell the contact picker. Right. And successfully we did well, we launched. That was 10 years ago. Right. This is 2010.

Christian Lovrecich:
Right. How many people are in the team at this point? Obviously you, did you have somebody else with you at the start or how did it go?

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. There’s always been at least two of us. Right now there’s four core full-time people and a whole bunch of freelancers and outsiders and people that are sort of experts at their craft and I don’t really have any interest in trying to build an internal expertise at so we outsourced probably a couple dozen people for different things. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
That’s the way to do it. Yeah. For sure.

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. I like it a lot that way. At first it seems more expensive but then you learn quickly that it’s actually not. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Right.

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. Yeah. So that was back then. It was just two of us. It was me and Graeme, who’s still the CTO, still the two of us kind of leading and in charge right now. And then once we had the contact picker and a bunch of people buying it was really neat because we got to see all the different use cases that exist for why somebody might want a contact picker, because it’s a tool. Right. There’s no prescription of why you’re using it. We’re not telling you what it’s for exactly. We’re just solving a pretty atomic problem within some other biggest thing that our customers are building. Right.

Jay Gibb:
So we get to see people using it and they’re building social networks or they’re building a CRM or they’re building an e-commerce site like a referral system or they’re building e-cards and event invitations and all the different places you can imagine where you might want your users to be able to manipulate or to give their contacts to the website for creating some recipient lists for some reason. Right. And so we watched that for a long time and supported our customers through that and kind of became experts in those different use cases. Right.

Jay Gibb:
Because we had enough people where I could start to go and look and say, “Hey, we had a couple 1,000 e-commerce companies using our contact picker, let’s go take a look at some slice of them and see what they’re all doing with it.” Right. And we see oh, there’s some people are using it for their referral programs to make it easier to input email addresses into a recipient list for a referral program. Some of them are using it for coupons so that they can recipient list to send coupons to your friends. Right. Or wish wishlists where you’ve made a wishlist or a gift registry or something like that and you want to share it with all the people that are coming to your event or whatever it is that the e-commerce site’s doing. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay Gibb:
And so we sort of saw that pattern and we saw that this contact picker was really useful for e-commerce companies, in particular the direct to consumer ones that have their own WooCommerce site or Shopify site or whatever. And now we’re starting to really focus on that particular use case and take all those best practices that we’ve learned over the years and build another layer of software on top of the contact picker. So that those guys that have those sites can start to get all the benefit of this research that we’ve done. Right. And then actually start to create something that expands the target or expands the sort of circumference of our product to solve some really specific problems for e-commerce businesses.

Christian Lovrecich:
It’s so funny that you bring that up about the patterns and once you started seeing what people were using it for, I just literally shot a video for the YouTube channel explaining how marketing audience segments, for example, when we get a new client and it’s a very generic product, we’ll go for the customer avatar, the generic customer avatar after we do some audience research. And once we start running on those ads and start looking back at the data that we’re getting back, we start to see all this audience segments emerge for what they’re using this generic product for. And then it’s oh, this person’s using it for their pets, this person’s using it to protect their business, this person’s… It’s this huge segment. It’s all military people.

Christian Lovrecich:
And it’s then we start creating marketing campaigns, speaking directly to those segments of the audience and the results go through the roof. So you guys essentially did the same thing. It’s you start seeing the pattern. It’s wait a minute. We created this app or a plugin and we thought it was just going to be mostly for this and all of a sudden we saw a pattern emerge and you did the right thing to do, doubled down, niched down on it and keep build from there since you were seeing that’s what most people were using it for.

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. I think for me it just comes naturally. And I think anybody that has something that you would just call a tool probably has a similar opportunity. Either they’ve explored it or they haven’t. But it’s like a wrench, right. A wrench can be used to fix a toaster or a tractor or who knows, there’s a million things you can fix with a wrench. And if you can get an idea for what people are using the wrench for, you can make a better wrench for that. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Yeah. Absolutely.

Jay Gibb:
Right. And when you start to go in that direction or maybe you can make six different wrenches for six different things if you’re stable and mature enough. And so I think it’s probably pretty natural. I don’t feel like this is a really special path, but in our case we saw these things and we did our own addressable market analysis and tried to figure out what’s the entrepreneurial path here? Which of these different use cases should we pursue and where can we deliver the most value? Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay Gibb:
And it just seemed like direct to consumer e-commerce was sort of overshadowed the other possibilities for us, at least for now.

Christian Lovrecich:
Yeah. So obviously a referral program for a brand can be a really, really big deal. So most people think it’s okay, I’m just going to hold an affiliate link and give it to people and expect for the best. So in your experience from what you see on the back end, how do you make sure you have the best referral program where you can take the most advantage using a tool like yours?

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. I think there’s a few things that are common out of all the ones that we’ve seen. Obviously the contact picker is something but that’s sort of a secondary thing. It’s more of an optimization step after you’ve got a functioning machine. Right. And in the e-commerce space the first one that I think is sort of universally is the double-sided referral program. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Double-sided referral program. I haven’t heard that one. What do you mean by that?

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. Well, you’ve seen them for sure. You maybe just haven’t heard the term, but it’s basically where both parties, the refer or the advocate, the promoter gets something in return for bringing a paying customer but the new paying customer, the referred party also gets something. Right. So that’s the double side. Both parties get some kind of motivation here. Right. So

Christian Lovrecich:
So let me make sure I get this right. So you we’re talking in terms of okay, I have the affiliate program and I’m giving you, I don’t know, 20% of all sales that you bring through your affiliate link then the other person that you bring on I can give him an extra discount. So it’s a ladder-type of deal. Is that what you mean by it?

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. But I wouldn’t use the word affiliate because this got its own meaning. Right. Affiliates are a little different than referrals, right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay Gibb:
But the rest of what you said yeah, totally. Right. Where you’ve got, if you just imagine a store, a normal BAC brand, right. Somebody using WooCommerce or Shopify. As somebody that loves this brand, I love these gym shorts and I think I’ve got some friends that work out a lot. I want to be able to send them a referral to buy these gym shorts, for example. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Right.

Jay Gibb:
And everybody that does, one side of the referral program is if my friend buys some gym shorts, I’m going to get 10 bucks off the next pair that I buy or I’m going to get some kind of reward for referring them.

Christian Lovrecich:
Got you. Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay Gibb:
But I want to send them something. I don’t want to just send them a link. I want to send them a coupon or I want to send them an offer that actually makes them buy the gym shorts and actually makes them pursue what I’ve sent them rather than just going through the front door ordinarily. Right. And that’s the second side where you can say, “Look, you’re going to get 10 bucks off your first purchase. And when you make that first purchase, I’m going to get 10 bucks off my next purchase.” Right.

Jay Gibb:
And so I think that double-sided nature is pretty important. I think having one or the other generally from what I’ve seen results in less impact, but they don’t necessarily need to be monetary. And that’s kind of the second thing that I would suggest. Anybody who wants to do this looks at, sometimes it can just be a gift. It can be some swag that gets added to your order or it can be… We’ve got one relatively large client called Stitch Fix or kind of like a subscription box for clothes where they do it for you.

Christian Lovrecich:
Oh, I know who you’re talking about. Yeah. I know who you’re talking about. Yeah.

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. They fit you. They figure out your waist size and your arm length and all that stuff and then they send you boxes and you take what you want or buy what you want and send back what you don’t. So the first step in becoming a Stitch Fix customer is to pay them 20 bucks to get your fix, in other words your fitting. Right. And so in their case, the one side of the reward program is a free fix. Right. So it’s not really monetary. They’re not actually taking money out of their margins. They’re just offering this service that’s basically just a form on a website. Fill out, take a few pictures if they ask you to.

Christian Lovrecich:
That’s smart.

Jay Gibb:
And so they’re giving you this, it’s like the perception of a $20 bonus but really it’s not, right. If you know what I mean. So I think figuring out what those rewards should be is an ongoing split test kind of problem that I think people work on, the people who do really well. Is they’ll figure out, is it 10 bucks? Is it 12 bucks? Is it nine bucks? Which side of it? Is it a coupon on for the next purchase? Is it a free scarf or something like that? And I think those rewards are always different. It really depends on the clientele and the type of product and all that kind of stuff. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Obviously, we know data’s important but what do you think makes or breaks a referral program? Because sometimes I see some where you offer a discount and all that stuff and then I see some other successful ones, but they’re not even offering a discount. So since you see all this data every day, what do you think makes or breaks a referral program?

Jay Gibb:
I think one of the things that seems to be an obvious differentiator between the winners and losers in my mind, well, I shouldn’t say losers, but the ones that are obviously outsized successes and the long tail, right – Is the presence of the referral program existence being everywhere on a site. Right. I think the ones I see that aren’t working as well, they’re just kind of burying the mention of the referral program in maybe one of the onboarding emails that you get or it’s in the footer of the website or maybe it was on a thank you page somewhere where they said, “Hey, by the way, refer your friends.” And send them a $10 coupon. And they’ve got everything else right.

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Christian Lovrecich:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay Gibb:
But then if they were just to take take those things and put them in more places, put them on the public website, put it in the main navigation, make it a part of every email you send out, put it into the receipt email. And if they just mention the referral program everywhere as many places as they can, put it in there, including their social media presence and anything else they’ve got going on and they really make that sort of a required part of being a customer, every customer is aware that this is the thing that they have and making sure that it gets the right kind of placement in as many places as possible, that seems to be the make or break.

Jay Gibb:
It seems to be the thing that anytime we get somebody who’s like, “Yeah. We’re not getting a ton of value out of this CloudSponge contact picker.” When we’re thinking about canceling, then me or our customer success people will go and look at their site and say, “Well, of course not. Here’s a bunch of places where you should put the link.” And we make a bunch of suggestions for where it should go. And we’re not really referral program consultants, although we’d behave that way in order to save the business and make sure we don’t lose a customer for the wrong reasons. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Sure.

Jay Gibb:
And really in that case, it’s not that our product is not doing its job, it’s that they’re not driving enough people to that page of their website where our product is installed. Right. So in order for us to really sort of earn the customer success term for that role, we want them to be successful. Period. Regardless of us, we want them to be successful in whatever their goal is. And obviously their goal is more sales.

Jay Gibb:
Obviously their goal is to make this referral program that they’ve invested in do better. And so the suggestion there is sort of outside of the CloudSponge contact picker area and it’s all around. And then when we get them to do that, and they’re like, “Okay. Cool. Let’s try that.” Pretty much all the time they’re happy that they did and things start going in the right direction.

Christian Lovrecich:
What do you suggest that everyone puts the sharing features on the e-com site? Because I’m not a big fan of loading up the product page with too many things that will distract you from adding to cart and just pulling the tracker. So I’m curious to see where on the website it performs best?

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. The product page it’s an important one but you’re right. It needs to be subtle. It needs to be just for somebody who’s looking for it. You don’t want it to be this is the most important part of our…. Obviously you’re not paying. You don’t want to interrupt somebody from buying something from you. Right. So-

Christian Lovrecich:
Sure.

Jay Gibb:
It should probably be there so that if this person is seeing a product that somebody in their life would like, they have a way to send it. Right. But I agree, I wouldn’t make it bold and obvious. I think the places where it goes, I listed a couple of them a minute ago. Right. So the emails, the receipt emails.

Christian Lovrecich:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay Gibb:
The post-purchase process. Right. After your, because again.

Christian Lovrecich:
The thank you page, I’m assuming. The Thank You page.

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. The thank you page. You don’t want to distract somebody. You don’t want to create cart abandonment by interrupting somebody with a request to make a referral when they’re in the middle of buying something from you. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Right.

Jay Gibb:
You got to be, block off that area and don’t mess with it. Right?

Christian Lovrecich:
Yeah.

Jay Gibb:
But then the thank you page, now the person’s got what they want and depending on what kind of product it is, it’s very possible that they know somebody else in their life that would love that same product, like the gym shorts example. Right. Or on Amazon or something, if you’re selling a book it’s very likely that if I’m going to enjoy this book probably somebody else in my life would also enjoy the same book.

Christian Lovrecich:
Do they have that on Amazon? I’m trying to think if… Because I study their pages all the time but I don’t think I’ve seen a suggestion.

Jay Gibb:
They definitely used to. I used to do that with one of my colleagues all the time. If I bought a book or if I was going to buy a book, I would ask him, “Hey, do you also want this book?” And if he said yes, which he always did because we had the same taste.

Christian Lovrecich:
Right.

Jay Gibb:
Then I would say, “Okay, cool. I’m going to buy it.” And I knew on the Amazon thank you page there was going to be a place where I could put it in his email address and send him a 10% off coupon for that specific book.

Christian Lovrecich:
Hmm. I’m going to have to go through it again. See if they still have that. Because I do the one click thing all the time now so its –

Jay Gibb:
I don’t think they do. Last time I looked, they didn’t have it. I remember at some point being sad that they removed it.

Christian Lovrecich:
Yeah.

Jay Gibb:
And I maybe it was just a split test and they whatever, obviously they’ve got all the data in the world to make smart decisions.

Christian Lovrecich:
That’s what I tell people all the time. I’m like, “Listen dude, you want to make your product page work, go to Amazon. Just look at it. Just look at with the way they have the stars, add the list, add it to the list or buy now.” It’s very subtle and I break it down all the time for people. I’m like, “This is the way to go.” And if you go to the big sites like Best Buy, GameStop, the big big e-commerce sites you can see they all follow almost the same formula. They do it that way because it works. Right. So-

Jay Gibb:
Yup.

Christian Lovrecich:
But I know another important part about to make it work it’s personalizing the message too. So you make it work with email. Do you guys see a lot of referrals through the email platforms from the e-com brands or do they stick mostly to the site itself?

Jay Gibb:
Well, with regard to personalization, I think the thing that most people do, the thing that you and probably anybody listening to this conversation I’ve seen, is an email, a referral email from a friend.

Christian Lovrecich:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay Gibb:
That just looks like it came from the brand, from the company that I’ve never heard of. Right. Right. And it’s like, “Hey there. I think you’re going to love this product. Click here to get a 10% discount.” Right. And this email it’s Christian sent this email on the brand’s website to me. I’m his friend. He has my email address. He typed my email address into the from field. Right. And the email that I receive has no mention of Christian at all. It’s just from this brand that I’ve never heard of and I’m probably going to go into the recycle bin or into the spam folder.

Christian Lovrecich:
Spam.

Jay Gibb:
And so what we try to train our customers to do is to use that address book to personalize the email, the referral email. So we’re not talking about personalization from an ordinary email marketing perspective.

Christian Lovrecich:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay Gibb:
We’re talking about the fact that if you use your address book to select me my record and maybe five other friends so that you could get five discounts or whatever then the software, your website, oh sorry, the brand’s website not only has my email address but they also have my full name because it’s in your address book.

Christian Lovrecich:
Right. Right. Right.

Jay Gibb:
And so the email, their site, their WooCommerce site or their Shopify site should send me, should say my name and your name, right. Should be Christian via store name should be in the from field. Right. So that it shows up as a person that I recognize and not just some store that I’ve never heard of before. Right. And then in the subject it should either have my name or your name like, “Jay, I think you’re going to love this product.” Or “Christian thinks you’re going to love this product.” Or something that actually is personalizing that referral email with the data that’s available in the address book. Right.

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Christian Lovrecich:
Yeah. Because if you just send… Sorry.

Jay Gibb:
Sorry. Go ahead.

Christian Lovrecich:
No, I was going to say because if you just send an email that just had some random subject line from a random email address that people are just going to delete it.

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. That’s part of the reason why a lot of referral programs aren’t working as well as they could be working.

Christian Lovrecich:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay Gibb:
Is because maybe everything else is perfect. Maybe everything and the whole experience on the site is really good. But the actual email that is being sent is terrible or totally unpersonalized. Right. And it’s just ending up in spam folders or even if it’s not ending up in a spam folder, we all get a lot of emails that are unsolicited all the time. And it just probably falls into that bucket a large percentage of the time.

Christian Lovrecich:
Right.

Jay Gibb:
And it’s amazing what kind of difference you’ll get in terms of open rates and then also conversion rates on the email when you can put the sender’s name and the recipient’s name into the subject line and the from field and you actually make it really well personalized. Right. And frankly you don’t an address book to do all of that.

Jay Gibb:
Because if you’re logged into a store and they know your name already, because maybe you’ve made a purchase there before and you’re sending referrals to people, those referral emails that the store is sending should include your name in the from field. Should be Christian via store name rather than just a store name. And that one little thing will make a huge difference for any referral program that’s already out there.

Christian Lovrecich:
Absolutely. And then you’re giving away the ebook, which is The Ultimate Better Sharing Workbook. Tell us a little bit about that.

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. So it’s a PDF file. Maybe a few pages long. It’s just got three sections in it and it’s basically for e-commerce store owners and it just takes them through an inventory and auditing process of their site and specifically around the sharing features on their site so that they can just evaluate and make sure that they’ve got everything. If they don’t have something they’ve consciously disqualified it and not just didn’t know about that. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Right.

Jay Gibb:
It’s a checklist of do you have wishlists? Do you have a newsletter referral program? Do you have a referral program? Et cetera, et cetera. It’s a list of all the sharing functionality that is the exhaustive list. Right.

Christian Lovrecich:
Yeah.

Jay Gibb:
And then it goes through, you can take each one of those ones that you’ve selected and audit it. Does it do this? Does it do that? How does it work? And it gives you kind of like almost a score for each of your sharing features. Do you have work to do or are they already fully optimized? Right. And then finally it helps with some measurement criteria and anybody that wants to figure out how to iterate, how to decide if they should do more experiments. It’s a worksheet to help to figure out what are the metrics that you should be measuring for each of these features.

Christian Lovrecich:
That’s really cool. That’s really cool. All right, Jay, listen, man. We’re out of time. I’m so happy that you came on. I’m so happy we were able to figure out our technical difficulties when we started.

Jay Gibb:
Yeah. Me too.

Christian Lovrecich:
But the app is available. I know for a fact it’s available on WordPress. Is it available on Shopify already or not?

Jay Gibb:
Yes. Yeah. We have a product. Our product is called Better Sharing and that the product is for WooCommerce and Shopify.

Christian Lovrecich:
Okay.

Jay Gibb:
So anybody using those can just search for Better Sharing. The CloudSponge Contact Picker is also available for anybody who has got that purpose and they don’t want those extra add-ons.

Christian Lovrecich:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay Gibb:
And so you just come and get both of those things from cloudsponge.com

Christian Lovrecich:
Right on. That is awesome. And Jay, where can people find you if they want to look you up, I guess

Jay Gibb:
Cloudsponge.com is the easiest. We got lots of contact. There’s kind of stuff there, we all pride ourselves on getting on the calls and talking to people if they have help that they want.

Christian Lovrecich:
That’s awesome.

Jay Gibb:
On Twitter, my username on Twitter is CircuitFive. And I can give you a link for that for your show notes if anybody wants to come me.

Christian Lovrecich:
Yeah. We’ll put all the links in the description like every episode. So guys, thank you for listening. Jay, thanks again for coming on. And guys remember, hit that like button, subscribe, give a review for the podcast if you listen on the podcast side of things. And remember, get Better Sharing both on WooCommerce and Shopify. Check it out. And see you guys. Until the next episode. Jay, thanks again.

Jay Gibb:
Thanks, Christian.

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